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maldita press

proud mama, writer, & bad girl por vida.

http://disciplesofmalcolm.tumblr.com/post/96133114326

maarnayeri:

Remember during the Bush era when liberals were huge anti-war activists and demonized Bush for destabilizing Iraq and invading Afghanistan, whereas Republicans didn’t bat an eye to the piling bodies and minimal progress in these regions? Now that Obama’s president, conservatives…

I been outta the country too long, need Nicki back in my life.

I been outta the country too long, need Nicki back in my life.

(Source: sharkeisha, via clickbreatheclick)

white girls/white passing “POC” amuse the shit outta me. get off the interwebz & be in solidarity with women of color in real struggle, like IRL.

luv of my life.

luv of my life.

First week of Kindergarten is over… Party time.

First week of Kindergarten is over… Party time.

Back in the USA & nothing feels the same except my lover’s warmth & my daughter’s laughter filling me with hope.

Philippines exposure trip with GABRIELA so far.

"People of color, women, and gays — who now have greater access to the centers of influence that ever before — are under pressure to be well-behaved when talking about their struggles. There is an expectation that we can talk about sins but no one must be identified as a sinner: newspapers love to describe words or deeds as “racially charged” even in those cases when it would be more honest to say “racist”; we agree that there is rampant misogyny, but misogynists are nowhere to be found; homophobia is a problem but no one is homophobic. One cumulative effect of this policed language is that when someone dares to point out something as obvious as white privilege, it is seen as unduly provocative. Marginalized voices in America have fewer and fewer avenues to speak plainly about what they suffer; the effect of this enforced civility is that those voices are falsified or blocked entirely from the discourse."
- Teju Cole (via newwavefeminism)

(Source: thoughtcatalog.com, via ahuacatlheart)

"Amílcar Cabral was intimately tied to the group of students born in the Portuguese colonies. By their class origin, the latter were objectively drawn from humble stock, from an urban petty bourgeoisie. The more sensitive elements were aroused by the tangible facts of colonial exploitation operating at the level of the mass of the people and whose effects, albeit to a lesser degree, they experienced in their material and social lives. Those who had reached the advanced training institutes (often at the cost of enormous financial sacrifices made by their families and by virtue of jockeying for assimilado vacancies) bore the stigmata of revolt. Armed with a privileged education, these assimilados were faced with a dilemma: either to struggle for their self-advancement in the framework of colonial society or to arm themselves culturally to challenge and destroy the system of domination. In other words, it was a matter of choosing between two views of life: either individual ascent by accepting the system’s rules, or total rejection, in effect breaking away in order to open the way to freedom for the strata most oppressed by colonialism."
- Taken from “Unity and Struggle: Speeches and writings of Amílcar Cabral” (page xxiii). Introduction by Basil Davidson. (via disciplesofmalcolm)